The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies

The Hobbit has been a long-time coming. We have wanted to see the ending to the prelude to the whole epic story of The Lord of the Rings, but Peter Jackson has taken a very long time to wrap it up. Middle-Earth is racked with problems when he takes a trip back to it, and back in time.

We are at the crucible of the story and trying to work how it all unravelled – the possession of the magic ring, the obsession with it. So, the wide-angled experience that you get to witness from Jackson’s films are etched out in deep-blue integrity because this particular saga also comes in three parts.

In the last film, Bilbo sets a dragon free, who rips up Laketown because this is a dangerous dragon. It is a special kind of a magical creature: a “fire-breathing and ensnared, snarling nostrils” dragon, a king of sorts, Smaug. Smaug is annoyed at Bard and seeing this, the dwarves escape to their mountainous home of Erebor, filled with gold, expensive shiny baubles, and this lures the dwarf leader, Thorin, away from all of the thunderous action, and into a greedy thing because he has to now fight all the other greedy beings interested in the expensive treasures, to claim all of it as his own.

The action and the suspense is prolonged enough to make you anticipate the ending, so even if you are loyal to the film franchise, you still end up being underwhelmed because the magical fantasy land is no longer filled with awe, its really about the thunderous battles.

Bilbo is not really present in the film much, because he goes to the Shire and curls up with a good book but that is because this is the prelude, and this is missing almost entirely from this latest installment of the new trilogy, which now instead boasts funny episodes and heartwrenching emotional chords, which have been well received. So, it really remains to be seen how long Peter Jackson likes the audience to anticipate a glorious end to all of the struggles for riches, and if indeed the ending has been worth the wait, to most.

Film rating: 7/10.

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